How I accidentally found a clickjacking “feature” in Facebook

I would’ve never thought that one of my first blog posts will be about looking for bugs in Facebook. I don’t consider myself a bounty hunter, and had never actively looked for bugs. I focus mostly on Incident Response, Forensics and Malware Analysis. To my surprise then I am sharing this particular story with you. It’s about my first bug report, a short spam campaign and a strange Facebook feature.

So, yesterday there was this very annoying SPAM campaign on Facebook, where a lot of my friends published a link to what seemed like a site hosted on AWS bucket. It was some link to a french site with funny comics, who wouldn’t click it right?

One of the SPAM links
Continue reading “How I accidentally found a clickjacking “feature” in Facebook”

Deobfuscating Emotet’s powershell payload

Emotet is a banking trojan, targeting computer users since around 2014. During that time it has changed its structure a lot. Lately we see massive emotet spam campaigns, using multiple phishing methods to bait users to download and launch a malicious payload, usually in the form of a weaponized Word document.

Emotet's chain of infection
Emotet’s chain of infection

First user receives a fake e-mail, trying to persuade him to click on the link, where the weaponized doc is being downloaded. Document is then trying to trick user to enable content and allow macros in order to launch embedded VBA code. VBA is obfuscated. We can also deobfuscate it, but in the end it launches a powershell command. Let’s skip VBA deobuscation today, as I want to focus on powershell. We can obtain powershell command launched by VBA code without deobfuscation, by using any sandbox with powershell auditing. Continue reading “Deobfuscating Emotet’s powershell payload”